Kopi Luwak User Manual

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Transition Systems

Read the entire manual before using the Quadshot. Not adhering to these instructions may result in serious injury.

Not recommended for children under 14 years. This is not a toy.

Thank you for purchasing a Kopi Luwak. This particular Quadshot has been hand built and test flown by the team at Transition Robotics.

The Quadshot is a novel aerial robotic platform with Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) capability. Highly dynamic maneuverability is achieved via a combination of differential thrust and aerodynamic surfaces (elevons). The relaxed stability, flying wing, tail-sitter configuration, Radio Controlled (RC) airframe is actively stabilized by on-board controllers in three complementary modes of operations, i.e. hover, horizontal flight and aerobatic flight. In hover mode the vehicle flies laterally, similar to a quadrotor helicopter. In horizontal mode it flies like an airplane to cover larger distances more rapidly and efficiently.

The vehicle is made highly affordable for both researchers and hobbyists by the judicious use in the design of the Paparazzi open source software and its Lisa embedded avionics suite. The materials selected create a highly durable airframe while still being inexpensive. The electronics are designed to be extensible as well, supporting the addition of extra sensors and actuators. Custom designed airfoils provide good payload capacity while maintaining 3D aerobatic flight capability. The wing design ensures adequate stability for manual glide control in non-normal situations.

The Kopi Luwak is for controls researcher and hardcore hackers. Identical to the Espresso, but with the Lisa/M upgraded to the larger and more expandable Lisa/L. Lisa/L pairs Lisa/M’s STM32 microcontroller with a piggy-backed Gumstix Overo Air computer module, featuring wifi and the powerful OMAP-3 processor. Lisa/L also expands on the sensors included with Lisa/M by adding a differential barometer for measuring airspeed. The Kopi Luwak comes fully assembled.

FCC Statement

Modifications and changes not approved by Transition Systems by the party responsible for compliance may void the user’s authority to use the equipment.

Note

All following uses of the word Mode are not in reference to the different channel mappings for transmitter sticks. This is in reference to the three different modes of flight the Quadshot is capable of.

Quadshot Specifications

Wingspan: 39in (1m)

Wmg Area: sq in (sq cm)

Weight: oz (6xxg)

Carrying Capacity: 10.5oz (300g)

Recommended Camera: GoPro, or a point and shoot that weighs 300g or less

Transmitter: FlySky CT6 2.4GHz

Brain: Lisa/L

Lisa/L

Information on Lisa/L can be found on the Paparazzi wiki.

FlySky CT6 6-Channel Radio System

File:CT6.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the switches labeled.

The FlySky radio is a 6-channel 2.4GHz system that allows you to fly without interference from other radios.

The Mode switch is on the left front face of the transmitter just above the left stick and switches between flight modes. The lowest position is Mode 1 and is used for takeoff, hover, and forward flight. The center position is Mode 2 and is used for assisted forward flight. The highest position is Mode 3 and is used for aerobatics.

The Motor Idle switch is on the right front face of the transmitter just above the right stick and activates the motors. The middle position activates the motors and the lowest and highest positions deactivates the motors. Once the motors are activated, they will spin slowly at an 'idle' speed.

Install 8 AA batteries in the transmitter. A light will illuminate when the transmitter is turned on. Change the batteries when the light turns red.

Caution! Do not fly the Quadshot when the light is red. You may lose control and crash!

Charger

The Kopi Luwak comes with a battery charger that does stuff. Here are some features:

Flashing lights

12V? US outlet?

beeping noises

other stuff

maybe balancing

buttons

Battery

The Kopi Luwak also comes with a 2200mAh, 11.1V, 3-cell lithium polymer battery with an XT60 connector.

To charge the battery:

Place the charger and battery on a heat resistant surface.

Plug in the charger.

Plug in the battery to the charger.

Specific instructions for charger.

Do not leave the battery unattended while charging.

WARNING! Overcharging the battery may result in a fire!

WARNING! Charging a damaged or hot battery may result in a fire!

WARNING! Do not charge batteries above 120 F (49 C) or below 40 F (4 C)!

WARNING! Store batteries in a fireproof container!

WARNING! Not charging the battery with a charger designed to charge lithium polymer batteries may result in a fire!

WARNING! If the battery pack balloons or expands, stop use immediately!

Detachable Pylons

The pylons on the Quadshot are not permanently attached. However, they are not designed to be added and removed before and after each flight. The connectors holding them in will wear out if used often. Avoid adding and removing them repeatedly. If space is not an issue, you may also glue them in permanently. We recommend either 5 minute epoxy or plastic adhesive. Be sure to put glue on the spar and the pylon socket. The Quadshot may benefit from leaving the pylons removable; in the event of a crash the pylons may pop out, absorbing some of the energy that would otherwise damage the Quadshot.

To install the pylons, place one hand under the pylon socket, line up the clip on the bottom of the pylon with the spar, and press the pylon straight down onto the spar until it clicks into place. Pull on the pylon straight out to make sure that it is locked in.

To remove the pylons, first disconnect the motor wires that connect it to the ESC. Then tip the pylon to one side until you feel it pop loose and pull out.

Cameras

To install a camera, remove the battery lid. Locate the supplied ¼”-20 bolt and insert it into the hole located at the bottom-center of the battery compartment. Using a coin or flat-bladed screwdriver, mount your camera to the bottom side of the Quadshot, opposite the battery door.

GoPro: The GoPro cannot mount to the Quadshot by itself. It requires the case which has a 1/4-20 mount. The case is also adjustable in pitch. If the camera is tilted forward or back when mounted to the Quadshot, the balance of the aircraft is upset and will fly worse. The suggested range of tilt is about 45 degrees forwards and 45 degrees aft. Any more than this may make the Quadshot very difficult to fly, if not impossible.

CAUTION! It is recommended that you fly the Quadshot without a camera until you get used to the controls.

CAUTION! Once installed, rotate the propellers by hand and make sure that they do not hit the camera. If they do, the camera must be reoriented so that the propellers do not hit the camera. A camera this far forward also greatly impacts the stability of the Quadshot. Avoid mounting a camera that adds a lot of weight ahead or behind the bolt.

CAUTION! Do not use a camera that weighs more than 10.5 ounces or 300 grams. If a heavier camera is used, the possibility of a crash is much higher. The lighter the camera, the better the Quadshot flies. The Quadshot is mainly controlled by the motors. If a high throttle setting is needed to hover, there is little motor power remaining to control the Quadshot.

Flying the Quadshot

CAUTION! If at any time the Quadshot does not land correctly and falls on the motors, flip the Motor Idle Switch to OFF immediately! The motors and motor controllers will be damaged if you do not shut the motors off quickly!

Installing the Battery

To install the battery, remove the battery compartment lid, marked by a battery symbol, by pressing down on the top edge and then pulling out and up.

pic

The battery fits best with the main leads (the two biggest wires with the yellow connector) in the top right of the battery compartment.

pic

Wrap the hook and loop strap around the battery and secure tightly.

Connect the battery to turn on the Quadshot. The Quadshot should be placed on a surface when plugged in and not held by hand. After plugging in the battery, the Quadshot should be left untouched for at least three seconds. This is to allow Lisa to stabilize. If the Quadshot is moved, it will simply take Lisa more time to stabilize. Put the wires in the recess above the battery. The lid will not close properly if the battery connector is placed on top of the hook and loop strap. The connector is designed to fit to the left of the battery strap.

Replace the battery lid by placing the bottom tabs in first and then push on the top to secure it in place.

pic

Safe Mode

Once the Quadshot is turned on, it is in a “safe” mode. The motors will not spin until a specific set of conditions is met. These conditions are:

1. The Quadshot has been on and sitting still for more than 15 seconds.

2. The Motor Idle switch is set to the lowest or highest OFF position.

3. The left stick on the transmitter is in the bottom-center position.

4. The right stick is in the center position.

5. The Mode switch is in the lowest, or Mode 1, position.

6. The transmitter is on.

7. The Motor Idle switch is set from the OFF to the ON, or middle, position.

CAUTION! Once conditions 1 through 6 have been met, the Motor Idle switch may be set to ON at any time to activate the Quadshot. The motors will then spin at idle speed, the servos will become active, and the Quadshot will respond to control inputs. Make sure that you are clear of the Quadshot and that it is clear of obstructions.

CAUTION! Do not hold the Quadshot when deactivating the safe mode. Only place the Quadshot on a flat and level surface free of obstructions when starting the motors. When in Mode 1 the Quadshot will make the necessary maneuvers to maintain hover. If the Quadshot is held at an angle and the safe mode is disengaged, it will suddenly move to a hover, or straight up position.

pic of transmitter in spin mode

The motors spin at an “idle” speed as an indication that the Quadshot is no longer in the safe mode. The idle also serves as a safety against reverse motor startup and poor synchronization during in-flight motor starts.

It is possible to have the transmitter conditions met under 15 seconds before Lisa is ready. In this case the motors will spin once Lisa is stable, 15 seconds after being powered on. Although the safe mode conditions may be met in any order, it is recommended that the Motor Idle switch be used to deactivate safe mode.

Takeoff

The Quadshot must first take off like a helicopter before it can fly on the wing like a plane. The Quadshot will take off in Mode 1 or 3 and not in Mode 2. A Mode 3 takeoff is not suggested and is only for experts. Use a flat and level surface for take off. Always take off from the ground and not a table or from someones hand. Always place the Quadshot with the motors facing up.

The Quadshot has a lot of reserve power when a camera is not installed. Because of this, takeoff requires very little throttle, somewhere in the range of 10 - 15%.

To take off, deactivate Safe Mode by meeting the conditions in the Safe Mode section. Slowly raise the throttle until the Quadshot lifts into the air. Be careful not to add throttle quickly the first time you fly the Quadshot as it will rise very quickly and you may lose control. If the Quadshot is not set on a level surface and the throttle is raised too slowly, the Quadshot will skitter along the ground and may catch on something and flip over. In this case, immediately flip the Motor Idle switch to OFF or the motors and ESCs will be damaged.

Do not touch any controls other than the throttle with the Quadshot on the ground with the motors running before it is in the air. It is possible to tip over the Quadshot with the throttle at idle if any other control inputs are made.

If the throttle is set too high, the Quadshot will shoot up into the air. It is possible to overreact and pull back power too much, causing the Quadshot to rapidly descend. During a quick descent in a hover orientation the Quadshot appears to be out of control but is stable. Instead of pulling back on the power quickly, the proper response would be to throttle back slowly until the Quadshot is in a hover, throttle back slightly more until it starts to descend, and then add power as it approaches the ground until the Quadshot is in a hover.

Camera: If a camera is installed, the takeoff will require you to pull back on the right stick a small amount, pitching the Quadshot up. If this is not done, the Quadshot will immediately start flying forward as soon as it leaves the ground due to the added weight on one side of the Quadshot.

Mode 1: Hover

In Mode 1, the Quadshot will maintain a hover attitude when no control inputs are made. It will ascend and descend depending on where the throttle is set. It will NOT stay in place if there is any wind. It will drift with the wind and only maintain a straight-up orientation.

Hover (Quadcopter) Controls

File:CT6B pitch.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the pitch axis highlighted.
A side view sketch of the QS with arrows showing pitch input reaction.

Up and down movement of the right stick pitches the Quadshot forward and back.

File:CT6B roll.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the roll axis highlighted.
A top view sketch of the QS with arrows showing quadcopter roll input reaction.

Left and right movement of the right stick rolls the Quadshot left and right as if it were a quadcopter.

File:CT6B throttle.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the throttle axis highlighted.
A bottom view sketch of the QS with arrows showing throttle input reaction.

Up and down movement of the left stick throttles the motors up and down.

File:CT6B yaw.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the yaw axis highlighted.
A rear view sketch of the QS with arrows showing quadcopter yaw input reaction.

Left and right movement of the left stick yaws the Quadshot left and right as if it were a quadcopter.

If at any time while in Mode 1 the sticks are released, the Quadshot will return to a straight up hover orientation as quickly as possible. This is useful for emergency situations, such as if you become confused, disoriented, or are about to crash. It is best to perform this with the throttle set slightly above hover power. If the throttle is set too high, the Quadshot may not have enough reserve power remaining to recover. If the throttle is set below hover, the Quadshot will immediately descend.

Mode 1: Forward Flight

As the right stick is pushed forward in Mode 1 the Quadshot will fly on the wing. It is not possible to point the Quadshot down in Mode 1. Pushing all of the way forwards in pitch will cause the Quadshot to fly horizontally. However, because the Quadshot has a symmetric airfoil, the wing will not generate any lift when pitched all of the way forwards or backwards. In this case the Quadshot will fall from the sky. To continue flying the wing must not be pitched all of the way over. Centering pitch will cause the Quadshot to return to a vertical orientation.

When pushed forwards in Mode 1, the controls will gradually change from quadcopter to airplane. The controls only change in yaw and roll. Pitching forward different amounts will change the amount the controls are swapped. The controls will revert back to quadcopter when the pitch is centered and the Quadshot is brought back to hover. This also works when flying inverted in Mode 1.

This may sound confusing but feels natural. In other words, the right stick in Mode 1 will always move the Quadshot left or right and the left stick will always rotate the Quadshot left or right. See below for more details on how quadcopter and airplane controls work.

Forward Flight (Airplane) Controls

File:CT6B pitch.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the pitch axis highlighted.
A side view sketch of the QS with arrows showing pitch input reaction.

Up and down movement of the right stick pitches the Quadshot up and down.

File:CT6B roll.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the yaw axis highlighted.
A rear view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane roll input reaction.

Left and right movement of the right stick rolls the Quadshot left and right.

File:CT6B throttle.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the throttle axis highlighted.
A bottom view sketch of the QS with arrows showing throttle input reaction.

Up and down movement of the left stick throttles the motors up and down.

File:CT6B yaw.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the roll axis highlighted.
A top view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane yaw input reaction.

Left and right movement of the left stick yaws the Quadshot left and right.

Note: The controls are the same for forward flight in Mode 1 and Mode 2.

Mode 2: Forward Flight

While in Mode 2 the Quadshot will fly at an angle of attack of eight degrees without control inputs. Because of the symmetric airfoil, this will generate sufficient lift for general flying. The Quadshot will NOT maintain altitude or direction. It will ascend and descend depending on where the throttle is set and will drift with the wind. It will only try to maintain a level orientation.

The Quadshot will also make coordinated turns in Mode 2 when roll is used. This means that the Quadshot will automatically pitch up and yaw in the same direction as the turn a small amount. This makes it such that turns are more graceful and require less input. Some coordination is still required in certain situations, such as at high angles of attack or high speeds.

To switch to Mode 2, first fly up to at least 50 feet. Point the Quadshot straight up as if in hover and set the throttle such that the Quadshot is hovering or rising slowly. Flip the Mode Switch to Mode 2, or center position, and the Quadshot will automatically transition into forward flight.

It is recommended to reduce the throttle a small amount upon switching to Mode 2. The Quadshot requires less throttle to fly on the wing than to hover. Because of this, the Quadshot will fly very fast after transitioning into Mode 2 if the throttle is not reduced.

Forward Flight (Airplane) Controls

Note: The controls are the same for forward flight in Mode 1 and Mode 2.

File:CT6B pitch.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the pitch axis highlighted.
A side view sketch of the QS with arrows showing pitch input reaction.

Up and down movement of the right stick pitches the Quadshot up and down.

File:CT6B roll.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the yaw axis highlighted.
A rear view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane roll input reaction.

Left and right movement of the right stick rolls the Quadshot left and right with automatic turn coordination mixed in, meaning it will pull up and yaw slightly in the same direction of the turn.

File:CT6B throttle.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the throttle axis highlighted.
A bottom view sketch of the QS with arrows showing throttle input reaction.

Up and down movement of the left stick throttles the motors up and down.

File:CT6B yaw.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the roll axis highlighted.
A top view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane yaw input reaction.

Left and right movement of the left stick yaws the Quadshot left and right.

If at any time the Mode Switch is set to Mode 1 while in Mode 2, the Quadshot will immediately return to hover orientation. However, do not throttle up the motors much higher than what it takes to hover or they may not have enough remaining power to recover from a bad situation. This is again very useful for emergency situations, such as if the Quadshot were about to crash.

If at any time while in Mode 2 the sticks are released the Quadshot will return to level flight. However, it will take a few seconds for the Quadshot to level off if it is descending rapidly. If you do not pull up, the Quadshot may still crash.

Flying with a camera: If a camera has been installed, the Quadshot will require more throttle, pitch up, or a combination of both to maintain level flight due to the added weight. This is most pronounced during the transition from Mode 1 to Mode 2.

CAUTION! Do not attempt a loop or barrel roll in Mode 2. The Quadshot will not pitch up more than vertical and will not roll more than 90 degrees. To perform aerobatics, switch to Mode 3.

Mode 3: Aerobatics

To switch to Mode 3, set the Mode Switch to the highest position. There will be no visible change to the Quadshot orientation once Mode 3 is activated. In Mode 3, the Quadshot will try to maintain whatever orientation you put it in. It will not recover from upset situations or coordinate turns in Mode 3.

Controls

File:CT6B pitch.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the pitch axis highlighted.
A side view sketch of the QS with arrows showing pitch input reaction.

Up and down movement of the right stick pitches the Quadshot up and down.

File:CT6B roll.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the yaw axis highlighted.
A rear view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane roll input reaction.

Left and right movement of the right stick rolls the Quadshot left and right.

File:CT6B throttle.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the throttle axis highlighted.
A bottom view sketch of the QS with arrows showing throttle input reaction.

Up and down movement of the left stick throttles the motors up and down.

File:CT6B yaw.jpg
FlySky CT6B with the roll axis highlighted.
A top view sketch of the QS with arrows showing airplane yaw input reaction.

Left and right movement of the left stick yaws the Quadshot left and right.

Remember: the Quadshot flies without returning to a neutral attitude when in Mode 3. A Mode 1 switch is always helpful in sticky situations. This is a better choice than trying to recover manually for beginner pilots.

Landing

The most stable method to descend quickly is to fully pitch forwards or backwards in Mode 1 with the throttle at idle. As the Quadshot approaches the ground, release pitch slowly and throttle up to a hover throttle setting at the same time.

  • 3 pics: hover high alt, push over mid alt, hover low alt

The Quadshot can also descend vertically in Mode 1 from a hover. It will, however, appear to be out of control during a quick vertical descent. This is because that when the Quadshot is falling bottom first, the airflow over the elevons is reversed, causing the opposite effect of the desired controls. However, the motors overpower this effect and keep you in control of the Quadshot.

If a vertical descent is required from hover, use a throttle position just below hover for a slow descent.

One method of landing is to descend as slowly as possible while maintaining position to avoid catching the landing gear on something and tipping over the Quadshot. This can be difficult as the Quadshot approaches the ground; the air becomes more turbulent the lower the Quadshot gets.

Another method is to get the Quadshot in a stable hover a few inches above the landing spot and hit the Motor Idle switch. This will drop the Quadshot right on target and practically eliminate any chance of breaking a propeller if it tips over since the motors will not be turning when it lands.

CAUTION! If at any time the Quadshot does not land on the ends of the pylons and tips over, flip the Motor Idle switch to OFF immediately! The motors, controllers, and propellers will be damaged if you do not shut the motors off quickly!

Repairs

The Quadshot wing is made out of expanded polypropylene (EPP) foam. The pylons are made out EPP foam with a plastic skeleton. It is recommended that you use either epoxy, hot glue, or 3M 4693 H plastic adhesive to repair foam on the Quadshot. Tape will not stick to EPP. It is recommended that you repair the plastic with either epoxy or cyanoacrylate (CA, super glue).

Replacing Propellers

Replace a propeller if it is bent, nicked, cracked or broken. Do not mix propellers of different brands, makes, or dimensions.

A front view of the Quadshot with motor location and spin direction labels.

Motors A2 and B1 use conventionally rotating propellers, while motors A1 and B2 use reverse turning propellers, marked with an R near the hub on the front face. To replace a propeller, grasp a motor by the chrome ring with one hand and pull the rubber O-ring over one screw and off of the motor. Remove the damaged propeller. Replace the propeller with one of the same kind. Make sure that it is facing forwards (numbers facing up). To install the new propeller, grasp the motor by the chrome ring with one hand. Place the O-ring under one screw and over the center of the propeller. Stretch the O-ring under the other screw.

pic of prop change process

Wire Harness

Lisa/L V1.1 top IO's labeled
643px]Lisa/L V1.1 bottom IO's labeled

The Lisa/L is rotated 180 degrees in the Quadshot, with Servo 1 in the bottom right corner and Servo 2 in the top right.

The ESCs are connected with signal and ground only; no 5V. Lisa/L is powered by 12V from the battery.

Lisa/L Wire Harness
Component Location Wire Color Connector Lisa/L Pin
ESC A1 Top Left Ground Gray Servo 1 GND
ESC A1 Top Left Signal Servo 1 S1
ESC A2 Top Right Ground Gray Servo 1 GND
ESC A2 Top Right Signal Servo 1 S2
ESC B1 Bottom Left Ground Gray Servo 1 GND
ESC B1 Bottom Left Signal Servo 1 S3
ESC B2 Bottom Right Ground Gray Servo 2 GND
ESC B2 Bottom Right Signal Servo 2 S4
Servo 5 Right Ground Black Servo 2 GND
Servo 5 Right Power Red Servo 2 5V
Servo 5 Right Signal White Servo 2 S5
Servo 6 Left Ground Black Servo 2 GND
Servo 6 Left Power Red Servo 2 5V
Servo 6 Left Signal White Servo 2 S6
Primary Receiver Left Ground Black ADC Spare GND
Primary Receiver Left Power Red ADC Spare 3V3
Primary Receiver Left Signal White ADC Spare U5RX
Secondary Receiver Right Ground Black UART 3 GND
Secondary Receiver Right Power Red UART 3 3V3
Secondary Receiver Right Signal White UART 3 RX

Low Voltage Alert

The Quadshot comes programmed with a low voltage alert. When the battery drops to a low voltage level, the Quadshot will wave its wings. You will see a high frequency oscillation in roll about four times in a second. This will happen four times, about 5 seconds apart, with less amplitude each time. At this point you have enough battery capacity remaining to fly the Quadshot nearer to you and land under power. If you see the Quadshot repeat the warning a second time, you should land immediately! If you see the Quadshot repeat the warning a third time, you will soon lose power!

CAUTION! Do not attempt to fly the Quadshot back to you after seeing a second warning or it will run out of power and crash! You should descend and land immediately.

CAUTION! If you overdischarge the battery it may become damaged!

Flying Tips

Each time after repairing or working on the Quadshot:

  • Check that there is a clip in each motor.
  • Check that the correct propellers are on the correct motors.
  • Check that the motors spin in the correct directions.

Each time before you fly:

  • Check that the battery in the plane is fully charged.
  • Check that the transmitter batteries are fresh.
  • Check that the pylons are fully seated and secured to the wing.

Fly the Quadshot in a wide open area. Do not fly near trees, poles, streets, wires, buildings, or a lot of people. Determine local laws and ordinances before choosing a location to fly the Quadshot.

It is not recommended to fly the Quadshot at more than 50% power when a camera is not attached. The motors are what control the Quadshot and at higher and higher speeds, the motors have less and less control authority which makes it harder to fly and stabilize. Also, the gains are tuned for general flying and do not work well at higher speeds. If greater than 40 mph (64 kph) speeds are seen the Quadshot will start to bob and weave in the sky. It is recommended that you fly the Quadshot slower than 35 mph (56 kph).

Dual Rates

Dual rates are not recommended. Changing the dual rates will change the maximum allowed pitch and airplane yaw/quadcopter roll angles. For instance, if the pitch rates are lowered to 50%, the Quadshot will only be able to pitch forward by 45 degrees from hover when in Mode 1.

Exponential

Exponential may be added if you are to use your own computer radio to increase or decrease sensitivity to inputs.

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting
Cause Solution
Motors do not spin Battery not plugged in Plug in battery
Transmitter is not on Turn on transmitter
Transmitter sticks not in neutral positions Neutralize sticks
Mode Switch not in Mode 1 Set Mode Switch to Mode 1
Motor Idle switch not armed Set Motor Idle switch to OFF then ON
Lisa is not stabilized Set Quadshot on stationary surface for at least 10 seconds
Quadshot flips over upon takeoff Incorrect propellers installed Check and replace propellers
It is too windy Fly when there is less wind
Camera is too far away from wing surface Mount the camera closer to the wing surface
Camera is too heavy Remove camera
Motor(s) spinning backward Switch two motor wire positions on speed controls to switch rotation
Quadshot constantly dives sharply Camera is too heavy Remove camera
Bottom motors/propellers damaged Check/replace motors/propellers
Propeller savers loose Tighten screws on propeller savers
Lids are not installed Install lids
Quadshot flies erratically Flying too fast Throttle down
Lisa is confused* Hover for a few seconds
Quadshot tips over upon landing It is too windy Fly when there is less wind
A direction is held on a transmitter stick Neutralize the sticks upon landing and set the Motor Idle switch to OFF
Camera is too heavy Remove camera
  • Lisa may become confused if a tight maneuver is maintained for an extended period of time; e.g. extended flat spins or multiple, back-to-back loops.

Parts List

Propeller

Reverse Propeller

Propeller Saver and O-Ring

Outrunner Motor

12 Amp Electronic Speed Control

Motor Clip

Pylon

Wing

Spar Covers

Electronics Box

Lisa/L

XBee, serial

Xbee, USB

Battery

Charger

Spar

Hook and Loop Strap

Winglet

Servo

Elevon Linkage

Wire Harness

Flysky CT6 Transmitter

Flysky CT6 Reciever

PPM Encoder Board

Academy of Model Aeronautics National Model Aircraft Safety Code

Effective January 1, 2011

GENERAL

A model aircraft is a non-human-carrying aircraft capable of sustained flight in the atmosphere. It may not exceed limitations of this code and is intended exclusively for sport, recreation and/or competition. All model flights must be conducted in accordance with this safety code and any additional rules specific to the flying site.

1. Model aircraft will not be flown:

(a) In a careless or reckless manner.

(b) At a location where model aircraft activities are prohibited.

2. Model aircraft pilots will:

(a) Yield the right of way to all man carrying aircraft.

(b) See and avoid all aircraft and a spotter must be used when appropriate. (AMA Document #540-D-See and Avoid Guidance.)

(c) Not fly higher than approximately 400 feet above ground level within three (3) miles of an airport, without notifying the airport operator.

(d) Not interfere with operations and traffic patterns at any airport, heliport or seaplane base except where there is a mixed use agreement.

(e) Not exceed a takeoff weight, including fuel, of 55 pounds unless in compliance with the AMA Large Model Aircraft program. (AMA Document 520-A)

(f) Ensure the aircraft is identified with the name and address or AMA number of the owner on the inside or affixed to the outside of the model aircraft. (This does not apply to model aircraft flown indoors).

(g) Not operate aircraft with metal-blade propellers or with gaseous boosts except for helicopters operated under the provisions of AMA Document #555.

(h) Not operate model aircraft while under the influence of alcohol or while using any drug which could adversely affect the pilot’s ability to safely control the model.

(i) Not operate model aircraft carrying pyrotechnic devices which explode or burn, or any device which propels a projectile or drops any object that creates a hazard to persons or property.

Exceptions:

  • Free Flight fuses or devices that burn producing smoke and are securely attached to the model aircraft during flight.
  • Rocket motors (using solid propellant) up to a G-series size may be used provided they remain attached to the model during flight. Model rockets may be flown in accordance with the National Model Rocketry Safety Code but may not be launched from model aircraft.
  • Officially designated AMA Air Show Teams (AST) are authorized to use devices and practices as defined within the Team AMA Program Document (AMA Document #718).

(j) Not operate a turbine-powered aircraft, unless in compliance with the AMA turbine regulations (AMA Document #510-A).

3. Model aircraft will not be flown in AMA sanctioned events, air shows or model demonstrations unless:

(a) The aircraft, control system and pilot skills have successfully demonstrated all maneuvers intended or anticipated prior to the specific event.

(b) An inexperienced pilot is assisted by an experienced pilot.

4. When and where required by rule, helmets must be properly worn and fastened. They must be OSHA, DOT, ANSI, SNELL or NOCSAE approved or comply with comparable standards.

RADIO CONTROL (RC)

1. All pilots shall avoid flying directly over unprotected people, vessels, vehicles or structures and shall avoid endangerment of life and property of others.

2. A successful radio equipment ground-range check in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations will be completed before the first flight of a new or repaired model aircraft.

3. At all flying sites a safety line(s) must be established in front of which all flying takes place (AMA Document #706-Recommended Field Layout):

(a) Only personnel associated with flying the model aircraft are allowed at or in front of the safety line.

(b) At air shows or demonstrations, a straight safety line must be established.

(c) An area away from the safety line must be maintained for spectators.

(d) Intentional flying behind the safety line is prohibited.

4. RC model aircraft must use the radio-control frequencies currently allowed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Only individuals properly licensed by the FCC are authorized to operate equipment on Amateur Band frequencies.

5. RC model aircraft will not operate within three (3) miles of any pre-existing flying site without a frequency-management agreement (AMA Documents #922-Testing for RF Interference; #923- Frequency Management Agreement)

6. With the exception of events flown under official AMA Competition Regulations, excluding takeoff and landing, no powered model may be flown outdoors closer than 25 feet to any individual, except for the pilot and the pilot's helper(s) located at the flight line.

7. Under no circumstances may a pilot or other person touch a model aircraft in flight while it is still under power, except to divert it from striking an individual. This does not apply to model aircraft flown indoors.

8. RC night flying requires a lighting system providing the pilot with a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times.

9. The pilot of a RC model aircraft shall:

(a) Maintain control during the entire flight, maintaining visual contact without enhancement other than by corrective lenses prescribed for the pilot.

(b) Fly using the assistance of a camera or First-Person View (FPV) only in accordance with the procedures outlined in AMA Document #550.

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Created 9/11

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